Audio Video Consulting

Dr. Johnson offers offers consulting services on the design and user friendliness of audio and video consumer electronics.

About

John E. Johnson, Jr. holds four university degrees in the bio-science fields, and has published numerous scientific books, along with dozens of scientific articles on biomedical research topics as well as imaging technology. He was the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of two medical/scientific journals for 20 years.

John holds several patents, including one on high resolution image analysis and one on a surgical instrument. Dr. Johnson has been affiliated with NASA, The National Institutes of Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Stanford Research Institute, and The University of California at Berkeley.

Services

Educator and Professional Speaker

Dr. Johnson offers informative presentations on a wide range of audio/video topics. He specializes in making highly technical topics understandable and enjoyable to the participants.

Audio/Video Product Analysis and Reviews

Dr. Johnson offers in-depth analysis of products at any stage of development, from design to completion. His analysis is both objective and subjective in nature.

Software Analysis and Improvement (User Friendliness)

Dr. Johnson offers his recommendations on making software user friendly and inclusive of additional functions.

Photographic Consultation and Services

Dr. Johnson offers design and functional recommendations on photographic equipment and software.

Editorial and Technical Article Services

Dr. Johnson has written many editorials and technical articles over several decades, as well as edited numerous books.

Percussion Reviews and Services

Dr. Johnson was the first person to perform spectrum analyses on cymbals.

Consumer Electronics Today

Editorial – Is Widescreen Still a Relevant Term?

Editorial – Is Widescreen Still a Relevant Term?

In 1953, 20th Century Fox changed the way we saw movies at the theater by introducing widescreen at an aspect ratio (width divided by height) of 2.35:1. It was called CinemaScope. Up until that point, movies were shot at the Academy ratio of 1.375:1. Several other...

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